Week 2 of 52

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Old Clothes and toys for UCDC Balwadi Bandra – Mumbai

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Came across this charity, please do any help.  We all do have old clothes, donate, rather than throw.
Good morning Everyone

Hope you are having a pleasant morning….today it is indeed a beautiful cold morning, the rising sun will surely brighten our day.

As you are aware that whenever I get an opportunity I am always helping the Urban Community Development Centre, Bandra-Mumbai from Kuwait. It is a home for the downtrodden, beaten women, abandoned children taken care of by the Urban Community Development Centre.

In the past few years I have been collecting old clothes and toys for the poor families and kids sheltered at this home and Gracy Rodrigues has always willingly joined me in my crusade to help them.

Currently, I am collecting old clothes for men-boys, ladies-girls, infants, sarees, suits and toys for kids (toys please do not give with the battery as they are charged at the customs).

Should you have any of these then please fold them neatly and put them in a bag and drop it at my Bestow classes anytime from 530pm to 730pm daily and on Fridays from 1015am – 1230pm.

Please visit DanceRobics-Sophie Fernandes page and take the address of our location to deliver your clothes/toys.

I will be sending these clothes on Friday 20th January 2012 and will sincerely appreciate your help for a noble cause.

Anyone who is interested can step forward and give them to me at class, may God bless you all abundantly for this noble cause. Please feel free to visit them if you would like to during your trip to Mumbai….your cause will be stronger.

FYI the more the cargo the better rate we get to mail it by sea cargo, hence please ask your friends too to step forward and assist those in need at this home.

God bless you always

With sincere thanks and prayers for you and your family.

Sophie Fernandes
65689494

MSI Serves Center?

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Why don’t people proof read what they want to print.  MSI SERVES CENTER…should be read as MSI SERVICE CENTER..

What is meningitis? – General Meningitis Questions

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With the fear of Meningitis in Kuwait, I have compiled some General Questions.
Q:
What is meningitis?

A:Meningitis is an inflammation of the membranes that cover the brain and spinal cord. People sometimes refer to it as spinal meningitis. Meningitis is usually caused by a viral or bacterial infection. Knowing whether meningitis is caused by a virus or bacterium is important because the severity of illness and the treatment differ depending on the cause. Viral meningitis is generally less severe and clears up without specific treatment. But bacterial meningitis can be quite severe and may result in brain damage, hearing loss, or learning disabilities. For bacterial meningitis, it is also important to know which type of bacteria is causing the meningitis because antibiotics can prevent some types from spreading and infecting other people. Before the 1990s, Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) was the leading cause of bacterial meningitis. Hib vaccine is now given to all children as part of their routine immunizations. This vaccine has reduced the number of cases of Hib infection and the number of related meningitis cases. Today, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis are the leading causes of bacterial meningitis.

Q:
What are the signs and symptoms of meningitis?
A:
High fever, headache, and stiff neck are common symptoms of meningitis in anyone over the age of 2 years. These symptoms can develop over several hours, or they may take 1 to 2 days. Other symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, discomfort looking into bright lights, confusion, and sleepiness. In newborns and small infants, the classic symptoms of fever, headache, and neck stiffness may be absent or difficult to detect. Infants with meningitis may appear slow or inactive, have vomiting, be irritable, or be feeding poorly. As the disease progresses, patients of any age may have seizures.
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Bacterial Meningitis Questions
Q:
How is bacterial meningitis diagnosed?
A:
Early diagnosis and treatment are very important. If symptoms occur, the patient should see a doctor immediately. The diagnosis is usually made by growing bacteria from a sample of spinal fluid. The spinal fluid is obtained by performing a spinal tap, in which a needle is inserted into an area in the lower back where fluid in the spinal canal can be collected. Identification of the type of bacteria responsible is important for selection of correct antibiotics.
Q:
Can bacterial meningitis be treated?
A:
Bacterial meningitis can be treated with a number of effective antibiotics. It is important, however, that treatment be started early in the course of the disease. Appropriate antibiotic treatment of most common types of bacterial meningitis should reduce the risk of dying from meningitis to below 15%, although the risk is higher among the elderly.
Q:
Is bacterial meningitis contagious?
A:
Yes, some forms of bacterial meningitis are contagious. The bacteria can mainly be spread from person to person through the exchange of respiratory and throat secretions. This can occur through coughing, kissing, and sneezing. Fortunately, none of the bacteria that cause meningitis are as contagious as things like the common cold or the flu. Also, the bacteria are not spread by casual contact or by simply breathing the air where a person with meningitis has been. However, sometimes the bacteria that cause meningitis have spread to other people who have had close or prolonged contact with a patient with meningitis caused by Neisseria meningitidis (also called meningococcal meningitis) or Hib. People in the same household or daycare center, or anyone with direct contact with a patient’s oral secretions (such as a boyfriend or girlfriend) would be considered at increased risk of getting the infection. People who qualify as close contacts of a person with meningitis caused by N. meningitidis should receive antibiotics to prevent them from getting the disease. This is known as prophylaxis. Prophylaxis for household contacts of someone with Hib disease is only recommended if there is 1 household contact younger than 48 months who has not been fully immunized against Hib or an immunocompromised child (a child with a weakened immune system) of any age is in the household. The entire household, regardless of age, should receive prophylaxis in these cases.
Q:
Are there vaccines against bacterial meningitis?
A:
Yes, there are vaccines against Hib, against some serogroups of N. meningitidis and many types of Streptococcus pneumoniae. The vaccines are safe and highly effective.
Viral Meningitis Questions
Q:
What is viral meningitis?
A:
Meningitis is an inflammation of the membranes (“meninges”) that cover the brain and spinal cord. Viral infections are the most common cause of meningitis; bacterial infections are the second most common cause. Other, rarer causes of meningitis include fungi, parasites, and non-infectious causes, including those that are related to drugs. (For more information, see What causes viral meningitis?.) Meningitis caused by viral infections is sometimes called “aseptic meningitis.”
Q:
Is viral meningitis a serious disease?
A:
Viral (“aseptic”) meningitis is serious but rarely fatal in people with normal immune systems. Usually, the symptoms last from 7 to 10 days and the patient recovers completely. Bacterial meningitis, on the other hand, can be very serious and result in disability or death if not treated promptly. Often, the symptoms of viral meningitis and bacterial meningitis are the same. For this reason, if you think you or your child has meningitis, see your doctor as soon as possible.
Q: What causes viral meningitis?
A:
Different viral infections can lead to viral meningitis. But most cases in the United States, particularly during the summer and fall months, are caused by enteroviruses
(which include enteroviruses, coxsackieviruses, and echoviruses). Most people who are infected with enteroviruses either have no symptoms or only get a cold, rash, or mouth sores with low-grade fever. And, only a small number of people with enterovirus infections develop meningitis.
Other viral infections that can lead to meningitis include mumps, herpesvirus (such as Epstein-Barr virus, herpes simplex viruses, and varicella-zoster virus—the cause of chickenpox and shingles), measles, and influenza.
Arboviruses, which mosquitoes and other insects spread, can also cause infections that can lead to viral meningitis. And lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, which is spread by rodents, is a rare cause of viral meningitis.
Q:
What are the signs and symptoms of viral meningitis?
A:
Symptoms can appear quickly or they can also take several days to appear, usually after a cold or runny nose, diarrhea, vomiting, or other signs of infection show up. Symptoms in adults may differ from those in children:
Common in infants
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Fever
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Irritability
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Poor eating
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Hard to awaken
Common in older children and adults
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High fever
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Severe headache
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Stiff neck
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Sensitivity to bright light
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Sleepiness or trouble waking up
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Nausea, vomiting
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Lack of appetite
Q:
How is viral meningitis diagnosed?
A:
Viral meningitis is usually diagnosed by laboratory tests of a patient’s spinal fluid (from a “spinal tap”). The test can reveal whether the patient is infected with a virus or a bacterium. The exact cause of viral meningitis can sometimes be found through tests that show which virus has infected a patient; however, identifying the exact virus causing meningitis may be difficult. Because the symptoms of viral meningitis are similar to those of bacterial meningitis, which is usually more severe and can be fatal, it is important for people suspected of having meningitis to seek medical care and have their spinal fluid tested. A hospital stay may be necessary in more severe cases or for people with weak immune systems.
Q:
How is viral meningitis treated?
A:
There is no specific treatment for viral meningitis. Most patients completely recover on their own within 2 weeks. Antibiotics do not help viral infections, so they are not
useful in the treatment of viral meningitis. Doctors often will recommend bed rest, plenty of fluids, and medicine to relieve fever and headache. A hospital stay may be necessary in more severe cases or for people with weak immune systems.
Q:
How is the virus spread?
A:
Different viruses that cause viral meningitis are spread in different ways. Enteroviruses, the most common cause of viral meningitis, are most often spread through direct contact with an infected person’s stool. The virus is spread through this route mainly among small children who are not yet toilet trained. It can also be spread this way to adults changing the diapers of an infected infant. Enteroviruses and other viruses (such as mumps and varicella-zoster virus) can also be spread through direct or indirect contact with respiratory secretions (saliva, sputum, or nasal mucus) of an infected person. This usually happens through kissing or shaking hands with an infected person or by touching something they have handled and then rubbing your own nose or mouth. The viruses can also stay on surfaces for days and can be transferred from objects. Viruses also can spread directly when infected people cough or sneeze and send droplets containing the virus into the air we breathe. The time from when a person is infected until they develop symtoms (incubation period) is usually between 3 and 7 days for enteroviruses. An infected person is usually contagious from the time they develop symptoms until the symptoms go away. Young children and people with low immune systems may spread the infection even after symptoms have resolved.
Q:
Can I get viral meningitis if I’m around someone who has it?
A:
If you are around someone with viral meningitis, you may be at risk of becoming infected with the virus that made them sick. But you have only a small chance of developing meningitis as a complication of the illness.
Q:
How can I reduce my chances of becoming infected with viruses that can lead to viral meningitis?
A:
Viral meningitis most commonly results from infection with enteroviruses. But there are other causes, such as measles, mumps, and chickenpox. Viral meningitis can also be caused by viruses that are spread by mosquitoes and other insects that bite people. The specific measures for preventing or reducing your risk for viral meningitis depend on the cause.
Following good hygiene practices can reduce the spread of viruses, such as enteroviruses, herpesviruses, and measles and mumps viruses. Preventing the spread of virus can be difficult, especially since sometimes people are infected with a virus (like an enterovirus) but do not appear sick. In such cases, infected people can still spread the virus to others. Thus, it is important to always practice good hygiene to help reduce your chances of becoming infected with a virus or of passing one on to someone else:
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Wash your hands thoroughly and often (see CDC’s Clean Hands Save Lives! web site). This is especially important after changing diapers, using the toilet, or coughing or blowing your nose in a tissue. For more information on hand washing, see the video Put Your Hands Together, listen to the podcast Put Your Hands Together.
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Cleaning contaminated surfaces, such as handles and doorknobs or the TV remote control, with soap and water and then disinfecting them with a dilute solution of chlorine-containing bleach also may decrease the spread of viruses. This solution can be made by mixing ¼ cup of bleach with 1 gallon (16 cups) of water. (See more about cleaning and disinfecting in general in CDC’s Prevention Resources).
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Cover your cough. The viruses that cause viral meningitis can be spread by direct and indirect contact with respiratory secretions, so it is important to cover your cough with a tissue or, if you do not have a tissue, to cough into your upper arm. After using a tissue, place it in the trash and wash your hands.
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Avoid kissing or sharing a drinking glass, eating utensil, lipstick, or other such items with sick people or with others when you are sick.
Receiving vaccinations included in the childhood vaccination schedule can protect children against some diseases that can lead to viral meningitis. These include vaccines against measles and mumps (the MMR vaccine) and chickenpox (the varicella-zoster vaccine).
Avoiding bites from mosquitoes and other insects that carry diseases that can infect humans may help reduce your risk for viral meningitis (see West Nile Virus, Fight the Bite!).
If you have a rodent infestation in and around your home, follow the cleaning and control precautions listed on CDC’s Web site about lymphocytic choriomeningitis

Week 1 of 52

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That’s a blueberry biscuit.

52 Week Project

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It’s quite a bit since I have posted.  I am thinking to do a 52 week project of photographing with a 5 MP normal phone camera.  One of the reason is its easy to carry around, and not many would prefer it too.  So stay tuned

2011 in review

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The QEIGHT stats helper monkeys prepared a 2011 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

A San Francisco cable car holds 60 people. This blog was viewed about 2,200 times in 2011. If it were a cable car, it would take about 37 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.